SUSTAINABILITY: The Buzzword which led Fremantle Nowhere.

 

THE NEW WEASEL WORD IS DEMOLITION

Fremantle’s current council were voted in on promises delivered by a mantra – Sustainability. But what progress has been made on the back of the buzz? Very little.

NOT PARIS. A neglected building in the heart of Fremantle's West End. Rumour is that this may become a victim of demolition and increased height. A chance for councillors to consider their obligations to voters, not to developers. ©Roger Garwood 2016
NOT PARIS.
A neglected building in the heart of Fremantle’s West End. Rumour is that this  building may become a victim of demolition and increased height. A chance for councillors to consider their obligations to voters, not to developers. 
©Roger Garwood 2016

Councillors  Mute in the Face of Developers

Now, with time running out on several plans, notably the King’s Square development, a new buzzword is worming around the West End – Demolition – and not a single councillor has actively promoted the notion of conservation and restoration and been courageous enough to condemn the plan to demolish 75 High Street. Forgive me if they have but it would be very useful for the public to become  aware of any such notions by their elected members.

Gobbledgook from the Green’s Corner

We have been blessed with Councillor Sullivan’s obfuscation in relation to the recent application for demolition of 75 High Street. Sullivan is a master of discombobulation, leaving readers and listeners wondering what he actually stands for. Interestingly he lists among his architectural achievements his involvement with the Leighton Beach and the Northshore developments. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it is up to individuals to judge those developments. Apart from Sullivan there appear to be no councillors with architectural experience.

Spongy Economics of King’s Square 

If we are to apply demolition tactics to old and singularly unattractive buildings we should look closely at the spongy economics of the King’s Square plan. An obvious option would be to give Fremantle a truly attractive town centre by demolishing the Myer building and the carpark at the rear as well as Queensgate. This area could then become an attractive central park which showcases the Town Hall and St. Patrick’s Church. It would have on one boundary a row of beautifully renovated cottages.   New council administration offices could be built on the Spicer’s site, overlooking the city square and accommodating a library above ground. (The current plan calls for an underground library). That is obviously not going to happen but it may be the best and most economical option for the city in the long run.

One of a number of Parisian shop fronts photographed by Lidia D'Opera. They display a stylish, appealing, shabby chic. A concept which could easily be emulated in Fremantle's West End. © Lidia D'Opera 2016
One of a number of Parisian shop fronts photographed by Lidia D’Opera. They display a stylish, appealing, shabby chic. A concept which could easily be emulated in Fremantle’s West End.
© Lidia D’Opera 2016

Is Conservation Uneconomical? That suppositon is easily disproved

Fremantle’s historic architecture is sustainable. Should the buzzword now be ‘conservation’ which, by its nature, encompasses ‘sustainable’? Critics have said restoration is uneconomical and that people don’t like working in old buildings.

The University of Notre Dame has restored a large part of the West End enclave. Their architect, the late Marcus Collins, successfully designed and directed the renovation of properties while maintaining the architectural integrity and character of the West End and he was able to work within what he described as a limited budget.

It's not difficult to find style, nor follow ethnic backgrounds. In that respect Fremantle has many options. The city has a number of strong ethnic communities who could help promote a colourful cross cultural background. © Lidia D'Opera 2016
It’s not difficult to find style, nor follow ethnic backgrounds in Paris or other major cities in Europe.  In that respect Fremantle has many options. The city has a number of strong ethnic communities who could help promote a colourful cross cultural background.
© Lidia D’Opera 2016

The success of the university in attracting students and staff to work and study in the enclave is patently obvious. Logic demonstrates that stylish, high quality, renovation of properties can be accomplished and make economical sense. Notre Dame have also demonstrated that it is not necessary to increase height. Interestingly so have Match with their east end redevelopment of the old wool stores. In spite of council approving a height increase on the building Match went back to their figures and decided it was more profitable not to increase the building’s height.

World Class Restoration Succeeds: Fremantle needs Civic Pride

The use of colour on shopfronts, and maybe the reconstruction of original shop fronts in the West End, is not beyond the realms of possibility. Conciencious developers and property managers should consider a range of options. © Lidia D'Opera 2016

More use of colour on shopfronts, possibly heritage colour options, and maybe the reconstruction of original shop fronts in the West End is not beyond the realms of possibility. Conciencious developers and property managers should consider a range of options. 
© Lidia D’Opera 2016

Recent world class restorations in Fremantle include The National Hotel, The Federal Hotel with the Warders’ Cottages nearing completion. Shortly the renovated Norwegian Consular Office on the corner of Cliff and Phillimore Streets will be unveiled. These are examples council should be noting and learning from. They should not bow  to pressure from property owners wishing to demolish and rebuild with added height using the developers mantra- ‘It’s the only way to make it economical’

Fremantle needs imagination, cultural nous and civic pride to be demonstrated and promoted by councillors, developers and architects.

Cities such as Paris take an enormous pride in conserving their precincts. So does Napier in NZ where a small group of people, within a relatively short period of time, turned their city’s fortunes around by promoting its architecture. <https://fremantlebackchat.org/2013/05/08/a-tale-of-two-cities/&gt;

Note: Many thanks to my colleague Lidia D’Opera for the use of her pictures. Her web site is at <http://www.lidiadopera.com.au&gt; and is well worth exploring.

A perfect example of conservation in the West End which contains the diverse social and cultural requirements of a city. © Roger Garwood 2016
Perfect examples of conservation in Fremantle’s West End,  containing the diverse social and cultural requirements of a city.
© Roger Garwood 2016

DEMOLITION DERBY FOR FREMANTLE’S WEST END?

Will Fremantle’s West End be threatened by property owners wishing to demolish buildings before  they become protected by legislation?

Robert Bodkin, of Bodkins Bootery fame, has alerted the Fremantle Society to the demolition application for a building within the West End precinct. The building, 75 High Street, is the office supply shop opposite Bodkin’s iconic establishment.

To be Demolished? This building in one of the most pristine architectural enclaves in the world, could face demolition. No plans are yet proposed to replace it.
To be Demolished? This building in one of the most pristine architectural enclaves in the world, could face demolition. No plans are yet proposed to replace it.

Bodkin is a committee member of the Fremantle Society which is rapidly recovering from five years of inadequate management, quickly regaining its position as an active supporter of conservation and high quality development.

He points out that a demolition application has been put before council but no plans have been submitted for a building to replace it. This is a situation which could result in a long term Mexican Standoff similar to that hovering over the King’s Square redevelopment which has been languishing for six years.

Apparently the owners claim the building is beyond restoration, that it has no notable features and they also note the verandah is missing.

It is likely that this application will be a test for both the council and the Fremantle Society but until plans for a replacement are submitted, and should demolition be approved, it becomes difficult to make a valued judgment.

There has been a trend to add height within existing precincts, not to mention some appalling architecture. A clear example is redevelopment of Attwell Arcade.

Under construction - extensions to Attwell Arcade
                 Under construction – extensions to Attwell Arcade